Friday, February 27, 2015

Indiana State Gazetteer and Business Directory 1858-59 - Decatur County before the Civil War




South Side of the Greensburg Square before 1850




 I recently came across a book "Indiana State Gazetteer and Business Directory -1858/59" by G.W. Hawes.  It is one of the earliest compilations of information that I have seen.  This information is taken from that book.  I hope you will find it interesting and that it might help with your genealogy.  Notice the original spelling of Greensburg.  If you have questions, please comment. Enjoy.

GREENSBURGH,

A post town and the county seat of Decatur county, situated on the Indianapolis and Cincinnati Railroad, 58 miles from Indianapolis, 52 miles from Cincinnati, 31 miles from Columbus, 32 miles from Lawrenceburg, and 31 miles from Shelbyville.

This town was laid out in 1822 by Thomas Hendricks, on elevated ground. The total estimate of trade and commerce for this place for 1857, amounted to $l,500,000. It contains the finest courthouse in the State, built, at an expense of $100,000; built in the middle of the public square, and which adds a great deal to the appearance of the town. It has two steam flouring mills, which manufacture a large quantity of superfine flour. It contains ten dry goods stores, twelve groceries, two carriage shops, two wagon shops, two saw mills, four jewelry stores, two daguerrean galleries, ten boot and shoe stores, two newspapers—the Democrat and Republican—five clothing stores, one bank, one large agricultural ware-house, one forwarding and commission warehouse, two drug stores, four hotels, one large union school, together with a number of select schools, all very well attended; four churches, viz: one Baptist, one Methodist, one Presbyterian and one Campbellite, having each neat and commodious places of worship. Greensburgh has the usual number of lawyers, doctors, ministers, &c. Population 2,500.

Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc.


ADKINS, S. M., MANUFACTURER OF SADDLES, HARNESS, TRUNKS, VALISES, &C, NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE.

Anderson, William J., dealer in groceries and provisions.

Batterton & Hazelrigg, dealers in drugs, medicines, books, notions, &c.

BELMONT, JAMES, grocery and provision dealer.

Belmont, J. P., attorney at law.

Bemusdaffer, Joseph W., county auditor

Bonner, S. A., attorney at law.

Bryan, S., justice of peace.

Cones, Robert, county treasurer.

DEARMOND, T. & J., DEALERS IN STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS, READY MADE CLOTHING, BOOTS, SHOES, & C., SOUTH-EAST CORNER PUBLIC SQUARE.

Decatur Republican, D. Batterton, editor.

Dillur, J., justice of peace.

Doan, E. G., dealer in dry goods and groceries.

Doble, F., cigar maker.

Dugan, Alexander, county coroner.

Dyer & Stockman, dealers in groceries and provisions.

Elder, W., justice of peace.

Ewing, Putnam, county recorder.

Forsyth, A. R., proprietor Greensburgh Bank.

Forsyth, A. R. & Son, dealers in hats, caps, boots and shoes.

FRENCH, I. W., surgeon dentist, office with Dr. E. B. Swem.

Gavin & Hord, attorneys at law.

Goodnow, J., proprietor steam grist mill.

Green, E., chair manufacturer.

Greensburgh Bank, A. R. Forsyth, proprietor.

HENRY, B. F., saddler and harness maker.

Hittle, J. P., dealer in dry goods, groceries, hardware, queensware, &c.

LEONARD HOUSE, JOHN LEONARD, Proprietor MEALS TO ACCOMMODATE ALL PASSENGER TRAINS.

Houser, J. E., justice of peace.

HOWARD, J. F. & J. A., DEALERS IN HARDWARE AND IRON.

Israel, M., grocery dealer.

Jocelyn, Edward A., county sheriff.

Joslin & English, proprietors livery stable.

LATHROP E. & L. P., DEALERS IN DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, CARPETS, HATS, BOOTS AND SHOES, WEST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE.

Lathrop, Ezra, attorney at law.

LEONARD HOUSE, JOHN LEONARD,PROPRIETOR.

LEONARD, JOHN, PROPRIETOR LEONARD HOUSE.

Levy, J. & M., merchant tailors and clothiers, under Town Hall.

Lovott, David, dealer in dry goods and groceries.

LUTHER, ROBERT, watch and clock dealer No. 29 Main st.

McCOY, G. W., GRAIN DEALER AND COMMISSION MERCHANT.

McCoy, G. W., attorney at law.

McKee, John, grocery dealer.

Montague, David, county surveyor.

Moss House, Daniel Moss, proprietor.

NEW, GEORGE W., physician and surgeon.

Pasket & Cochran, grocery dealers.

Phares, I. T., dealer in hardware and iron.

POOL, A. &. J., DEALERS IN ITALIAN AND AMERICAN MARBLE, MONUMENTS, TOMB STONES. &c. NORTH SIDE RAIL ROAD, NEAR CHRISTIAN CHURCH.

RiCHARDSON, MARTIN W., DEALER IN DRUGS, GROCERIES, MEDICINES,

JEWELRY, & c, EAST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE.

Robbins, Richard, attorney at law.

Rozell, G. B., attorney at law.

Samuel, J. W., grocery dealer.

Scoby & Cumback, attoneys at law.

SEITZ CHRISTIAN, BAKER AND DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF GROCERIES

Shane, C., attorney at law.

Shaw, B. C., carriage maker.

Sparks, Amos, grocery dealer.

STEPHENS & GROVER, DEALERS IN DRY GOODS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES.

Stewart, B. & J., dealers in drugs, groceries and queens ware.

STOUT & SHIRK, produce and commission merchants, and dealers in agricultural

implements.

Stout, H., dealer in stoves and tin ware.

Talbott, Henry H., county clerk.

Trisher, F. M., jeweler.

Tucker, J. L., hat and cap dealer.

Vancamp, G. C., stove and tin ware dealer.

VAN HORN, W. H., POST MASTER.

Warriner, Franklin, saddler and harness maker.

WILSON, B. W., ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY PUBLIC.

Wix, P., attorney at law.

Woodfill, G. & Sons, dealers in dry goods
 

ADAMS,

A post village in the township so called, and Decatur county, situated on the Indianapolis and Cincinnati Railroad, and

is surrounded by a highly rich and productive country. Large quantities of grain and produce are bought at this point by extensile dealers and shipped eastward. It contains three general stores, one grocer, one hotel, one express office,

three carpenters, one attorney, one physician, one steam saw mill, one blacksmith, one post office, one flour and grain dealer, one carriage maker, one justice of the peace, one painter, and one clergyman (Baptist). Distance 40 miles south-east of Indianapolis, and a miles north-west of Greensburgh, the county seat. Population 56.


Alphabetical List of Professions, Trades, Etc.

Caldwell, Wm. H., carpenter and builder.

Caldwell, Wm. II., farmer.

Connett, Malon C, eclectic physician.

Crouch, Geo. W., general store.

HAZELRIG, CLAY.

Hungate, Geo. W., grocer.

Hungate ,Geo. W., flour and grain dealer.

JONES, PRESTON, POST MASTER.

Jones, John, lawyer.

Jones, Preston, general store.

Jones, Preston, clergyman (separate Baptist.)

Jones, John, general store.

Piper, James, carpenter and builder.

Pleak, Joseph D., express office.

Riley, N. W., justice of the peace.

Ryne, Wm., hotel keeper.

Ryne, Win., carriage and wagon maker.

Steward, Barney W., steam saw mill.

Steward, B. W., carpenter and joiner.

Steward, William T., painter.

Whitlow, Hiram, blacksmith.

Saturday, February 21, 2015

http://crescentok.com/staff/jaskew/TAH/projects/english/fall2010.htm


Friday, February 20, 2015

Donners in Decatur County?





Nearly 170 years ago on February 19, 1847, the first rescuers reach surviving members of the Donner Party, a group of California-bound emigrants stranded by snow in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.
In the summer of 1846, a migration fever swept our country leading pioneers to long for new cheaper settlements in the largely unsettled west. Families started to move westward in wagon trains, leaving most of their belongings and their families for the dream of better lives.
In the summer of 1846, 89 people--including 31 members of the Donner and Reed families—packed up their children and what belongings they could fit into a Conestoga type wagon and set out in a wagon train from Springfield, Illinois. After arriving at Fort Bridger, Wyoming, the emigrants made what was later determined to be a fatal mistake and decided to avoid the usual route and try a new trail recently blazed by California promoter Lansford Hastings, the so-called "Hastings Cutoff." After electing George Donner as their captain, the party departed Fort Bridger in mid-July.  The shortcut was nothing of the sort: It set the Donner Party back nearly three weeks and cost them much-needed supplies. After suffering great hardships in the Wasatch Mountains, the Great Salt Lake Desert and along the Humboldt River, they finally reached the Sierra Nevada Mountains in early October. Despite the lateness of the season, the emigrants continued to press on, and on October 28 they camped at Truckee Lake, located in the high mountains northwest of Lake Tahoe. Overnight, an early winter storm blanketed the ground with snow, blocking the mountain pass and trapping the “Donner Party”.
Some members of the group stayed near the lake--now known as Donner Lake--while the Donner family and others made camp six miles away at Alder Creek. Using their wagons to make shelters and killing their oxen for food, they hoped for a thaw that never came. Fifteen of the stronger emigrants, later known as the Forlorn Hope, set out west on snowshoes for Sutter's Fort near San Francisco on December 16. Three weeks later, after harsh weather and lack of supplies killed several of the expedition and forced the others to resort to cannibalism, seven survivors reached a Indian settlement from where they were able to send ahead for help.
A rescue party set out on January 31.  Arriving at Donner Lake 20 days later, they found the camp completely snowbound and the surviving emigrants delirious with relief at their arrival. Rescuers fed the starving group as well as they could and then began evacuating them. Three more rescue parties arrived to help, but the return to Sutter's Fort proved equally harrowing, and the last survivors didn't reach safety until late April. Of the 89 original members of the Donner Party, only 45 realized the dream of greener lands in the west.
What is largely unknown is that a George Donner entered land in Fugit Township in Decatur County in 1821.  Was that the same George Donner who 25 years later packed up his family and became the George Donner of “Donner Party” fame? There are still those who say it was.